Unlocking home renovation in Europe

As bills rise, the planet gets hotter, and the energy crisis rages, fuelled by foreign fossil fuel exports, it’s clear that we cannot continue to burn fossil fuels as we do now. In the European Union (EU), buildings are currently responsible for 36% of carbon emissions – we need to take urgent measures to reduce energy use in our homes. Our people-powered “Unlock” campaign is based on three key demands to make this happen.

New research paper: The role of the EU Parliament in the ECB’s green shift

A new study traces how climate change became a topic in Europe’s monetary policy. Utilising a novel and extensive dataset, it shows how the European Parliament, early on, called for a greener monetary policy and eventually allied with members of the ECB to forge a consensus on monetary policy and climate change. The study was financially supported by Positive Money Europe and authored by Dr. Elsa Massoc, a postdoctoral researcher at the Center for the Advanced Studies of Law and Finance.

Climate roadmap: now what? Next steps for the ECB to support the low-carbon transition

In 2021, the ECB embraced a major shift in thinking by adopting a roadmap on climate change. However, given the urgency of the environmental breakdown and the current energy costs crisis, progress remains too slow. Together with 16 partner NGOs, we offer the ECB recommendations on how to best implement the ECB’s climate strategy.

New Research: “The role of central banks’ credit rating in mitigating climate and environmental risk”

New research by Positive Money Europe and WWF proposes expanding the role of Eurosystem’s own internal credit assessment systems, the so-called ICASs, to integrate climate and environmental risks. We see the increasing role and potential of C&E risk integration into ICASs as a concrete, workable and impactful way to green the collateral framework.

FROM THE BLOG

How monetary policy fuels housing inequality

How monetary policy fuels housing inequality

Extensive research shows that the past decade of low-rates monetary policy has significantly contributed to rising house prices, thus fuelling a self-propagating mechanism of wealth inequality and decreasing housing affordability. However, raising rates can also harm economic welfare. How can policymakers make a fairer housing market?

Unlocking home renovation in Europe

Unlocking home renovation in Europe

As bills rise, the planet gets hotter, and the energy crisis rages, fuelled by foreign fossil fuel exports, it’s clear that we cannot continue to burn fossil fuels as we do now. In the European Union (EU), buildings are currently responsible for 36% of carbon emissions – we need to take urgent measures to reduce energy use in our homes. Our people-powered “Unlock” campaign is based on three key demands to make this happen.

A review on the distributional effects of monetary policy

A review on the distributional effects of monetary policy

Inequality has long been a foremost public concern, but not so for central banks. While the orthodoxy according to which central banks engage in “neutral” policy-making is slowly crippling away, we’re still enormously far from taking the distributional consequences of money creation and allocation seriously. Intensifying the debate on the inequality effects of the central bank’s monetary policy is a small step in that direction. This blog suggests several starting points for that. 

A people’s monetary dialogue: what our supporters want from the ECB

A people’s monetary dialogue: what our supporters want from the ECB

True to our commitment to being the bridge between people and the European Central Bank (ECB), ahead of the last monetary dialogue in June we collaborated with our friends at SumOfUs to collect our supporters’ views, expectations and concerns related to the ECB’s work. The results showed overwhelming support for ambitious and proactive environmental actions by the ECB. They also rang a bell about the need for clearer communication from the Central Bank on the effects of its interest rate hikes.

The European Central Bank hikes interest rates after over a decade. Is this the right move for people? 

The European Central Bank hikes interest rates after over a decade. Is this the right move for people? 

On July 21st, the European Central Bank (ECB) announced that it is raising interest rates by 0.5 per cent, opting for an even higher hike than what was announced in June. Over the past few months, Positive Money Europe has repeatedly warned that higher interest rates are simply not the right solution to current price increases, as they will negatively affect people and jeopardise the well-being of our economies and the future of the post-pandemic green recovery. Why do we think so? In this blog, we answer a few questions about the impact that rising interest rates will have on people’s daily lives.

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